Pictures Oso Easy Roses by PW

100_8318 First is Oso Easy Fragrant Spreader by Proven Winners Plants and it is very fragrant. It smells like an old fashioned rose. That is one plant above which was planted in May 2008. It is evergreen in my Zone 7 garden. It blooms like this all summer. This picture was taken yesterday.

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I have to keep it trimmed once a month as it spreads by layering. It also spreads normally and stretches out its arms about 3 feet. Those arms bury under the mulch and make another plant. So every month, I take my Fiskers and wack it off.

These Oso Easy roses would be good in containers or on a hill. I may move it at the end of this season. My only complaint about this plant is how the blooms lay low to the ground if any rain or wind comes along as you can see it doing above. The blooms form in clusters at the end of the stems.

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Here is Paprika. It hasn’t grown as wide and it’s my favorite of all the Oso roses. It’s not as aggressive. I love the blooms and they really make a statment.

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It stands more upright  but is still a spreader. None of my Oso roses have had any pest or disease even when the others did. My garden is totally organic. If I see a bug, I use a strong home made soap spray. Remember to use soap and not detergent. Detergent will only clean the bugs. Soap dries out their exoskeleton or soft bodies.

Here it is below behind the Red Twig Dogwoods that I’m training in to small trees that will frame my entryway. Just to remind everyone, my gardens are only a year old. I’ve been a gardener for 40+ years and so when I moved in this house last April 08, I knew how to prepare the gardens and exactly what plants I wanted.

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Below is Oso Easy Strawberry Crush. She is the most graceful looking of the three. She grows about the same as Fragr

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Next in my garden will be Senorita Rosalita Cleome

3 Comments Add yours

  1. Susanna says:

    Thank you so much for the precious info and the pictures! Do you think/have any info on whether OSO roses would grow and bloom well in part-shade (5-6 hrs of sun a day)?

    Also, which is more floriferous – OSO roses or KNOCKOUT roses in part shade?

    Thank you, I think they would both need at least 6 hours a day. I have one( knockout) growing in 4 hours and it’s not as big or floriferous. It still blooms but just not half as much.

    Knock Outs grow more upright and Oso Easy is more of a ground cover—with Paprika being more upright perhaps. Oso is a tall ground cover growing to 2 feet or more when a few of the canes stretch out before falling over. Mine got too big for the garden so I gave them to our town. Fragrant Spreader and Paprika are coming back. One Oso Easy was 5 feet or more wide.

    Knock Outs are more flowering and do so consistently if fertilized well during blooming. Don’t put liquid fertilizer on leaves of a Knock Out. I use Espoma Rose Tone and compost with mushroom compost.

    Oso Easy Fragrant Spreader smells wonderful but my fav is Paprika. I still love my Knock Outs maybe best. If I had a hill to cover–I’d go with Oso Easy and Fragrant Spreader blooms the most but Paprika bloomed earliest.

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  2. Brooke says:

    That is just beautiful hun, thanks for sharing. Have a great day~ Brooke
    Thank you

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  3. Phillip says:

    And such simple, pretty flowers. I prefer the bigger Shrub Roses but these make really good ground cover and spots of loveliness.
    I prefer the bigger roses too and these may get moved. But they are doing what they advertised to do and that is spread. It would be great for a hill or in a pot.

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