Haint Blue Porch Ceiling at Freeman Pottery

Haint Blue Porch Ceiling at Freeman Pottery with Flea Market Style Gardening

Judy Freeman Foushee went to college to take a painting class and ended up in a pottery class. Judy works the clay in a family farmhouse that goes back 5 generations. You first notice the haint blue porch ceiling at Freeman Pottery. Judy says it’s been that color since as far back as she can remember.

Judy is the first person in her family to choose being a potter as the other 4 generations chose farming. The farmhouse with it’s one main chimney serving 3 fireplaces is just one of the charming features she tells me about. The 1800’s 4 porch structure is framed by its 12/12 pitch roof and recognized by the heart vents on each gable.

The front of the house has two porches with one for the kitchen and one for the living area. Haint blue porch ceilings ward off insects it is thought by Judy and I explained to Judy the folklore surrounding the color. I wrote another story on Haint Blue at this post and explained the theory by some that the color allows haints or spirits to escape up to the sky instead of getting trapped. Once trapped the spirits are likely to enter the house. Judy assured me that there were no spirits at this house and that generations of her family have been Christian.

I can imagine that during the 1800’s it wasn’t easy to craft hearts in the vents on each gable. Makes me think the owner must have loved his wife very much to allow this crafted detail. I too want hearts on the vents of my future farmhouse. I may just build a house exactly like this floor plan. It was very functional and fun. It’s a 3 bedroom home with two additional back porches that help protect from the hot Seagrove climate. It is said that the first owner loved the back right porch the most due to the breezes that flowed there.

Judy is known for her pottery miniatures. She has the largest selection. They are numerous in style and design. Some are face jugs depicting personalities in government and some just down right funny buck toothed creations. Judy is witty and hugely talented at adding character to each piece. No two are alike.

She has a drunken man’s jug where any handle can be grabbed easily. She has the traditional Rebecca’s pitcher from the story in the bible. But her signature pieces are those fashioned in a style called sgraffito. Sgraffito is the process of layering different colored clay then sculpting scenery from those layers. She is most known for scenes of barns, hillsides, trees, and fences. She depicts her scenes in both winter and summer.

Her pieces are hand turned and she fires them herself right there in the little farmhouse built in the 1800’s. Sitting on a pretty piece of land with nothing around much but farmland and quiet neighbors who are used to hearing Judy at her wheel.

Judy says there isn’t much traffic down her way and that you still look up when a car passes. You most likely know the driver. You most likely have known them your whole life.

In 2005, Judy thought up Vezzel puzzles which doesn’t surprise me after meeting her. She’s the type person who has the sort of conversation that makes you smile the whole visit. Her Vezzel puzzles are a grouping of small pottery pieces that will only fit one way on their tray. They come with a photo of their proper placement and pitty the person who loses the cheat sheet.

Judy is a natural flea market style gardener. She has small flower beds dotting the property that are home to discarded pottery pieces and old farm implements. Some of the roses and ornamental shrubs that grow on her property were planted by her mother or grandmother. It’s an attractive mix of memorabilia. The old tobacco hook above was used on the farm when Judy’s family farmed tobacco.

If you see something you like here, you’ll have to contact Judy directly.

Freeman Pottery
Judy Freeman Foushee
PO Box 283, Eagle Springs, NC, 27242

5 comments on “Haint Blue Porch Ceiling at Freeman Pottery with Flea Market Style Gardening

  1. Pingback: Haint Blue Porch Ceiling at Freeman Pottery with Flea Market Style Gardening - Perfect Plants | Perfect Plants

  2. I can see why you want a farmhouse like this one. There is so much attention to detail on the structure. Judy is very talented in her craft.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s