Oh baby Mahonia ‘Soft Caress’ A shade plant!

Oh yea, bring it on cause she truly does have a Mahonia ‘Soft Caress’. I’m growing it!!! Another I brought home from the GWA in Raleigh, NC. I’m not lucky folks–I’m a hard working plant writer who says–now let’s just see if this will survive our winter? I do it for you and me ;)

A gardener who lives in my neck of the woods is normally saying—will it survive summer’s heat and humidity—in this case, was it the winter? She did….she survived a cold winter too. I’m more on the 7a side than 7b and this was not sheltered. She’s green and soft and pretty much looks like the above photo. There are a few brown spots at the top but not a big deal.

She’s suppose to bloom some buttery yellow elongated flower clusters in early winter–I’ve not seen that yet. I think it grows a bit fast–but oh so much more the better don’t you think? I have it growing in my front lawn in dappled light. The feel is addictive with the feathery feel.

And too—it’s a bit dry at that spot. So I’ve defied and pushed all the parameters–isn’t she sweet?!

From Novalis–Plants That Work!

Mahonia ‘Soft Caress’ – Feathery Foliage

Mahonia eurybracteata ‘Soft Caress’ PP20183

A unique new selection! Feathery foliage for the shade garden. Bright yellow flowers in early winter.

Few plants offer the texture that ‘Soft Caress’ provides the shade garden. Slender, bamboo-like foliage forms an evergreen, medium-sized shrub. In early winter racemes of bright-yellow flowers stand atop the foliage like fingers of light. Perfect for an Asian garden or as a single specimen, ‘Soft Caress’ has its roots in Japan.

Seasonal Interest: Year-round

Zones: 7b-11

Average Height: 3-4′

Exposure: Part Shade

Soil: Moist/Well-drained

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10 comments on “Oh baby Mahonia ‘Soft Caress’ A shade plant!

  1. I had this beautiful plant added in my landscape last summer right before the heat and draught and it did beautiful until the February cold and snow. The soft caress lost all of its leaves but now has a few new ones. What can I expect as far as a come back with this plant?

    Thanks for any help.

  2. I’ve had Mahonia for years, but the Leather-leaf kind, and enjoyed this easy and interesting plant. Now, I’ve discovered its cousin, and I have fallen in love! The Soft Caress is a stunner. Beautiful “ferny” fronds that add interest to a shady site. I’ve planted it amid ferns, acuba, camellia, and a few other assorted shade plants. I adore the yellow flowers that pop up one top…they add even more uniqueness. This plant is a feathery joy. Look for it; promise it will quickly become one of your favorites, too!

  3. I am interested in the Soft Caress Mahonia, we have them at our nursery in North Texas.
    My question is re: wind tolerance, as I want to give one to my mother for the beach house in Port Aransas, Texas. It would live in a large container on a patio under the stilted house.
    Not sure if occasional strong coastal winds would snap it to pieces. Thanks for any info you can give me.

  4. I just planted this today in my Japanese garden. She is a beauty and I am hoping she survives here in zone 7. I’ll keep you posted.

      • Me, again………a year later. My Mahonia ‘SoftCaress’ is still beautiful, surviving the heat, the drought and a cold snowy winter here in northern DE. I loved the yellow flowers in the fall. She had grown 6 inches this spring. Everyone asks what it is, since noone has been growing them sucessfully this far north . A gorgeous addition to my Japanese garden!!

  5. Hi Anna

    Just beautiful, I like Mahonia and grox x media ‘Charity’ but I think I prefer yours!

    Thanks so much for you knid offer on the hollyhock post. I don’t know what the regs are to be honest, I’d love to try that bloom juice, what d’you reckon.

    Happy Easter to you and yours.

    Rob

  6. Looks like a nice plant Anna, I will be interested in how it performs for you. I have looked this up but it doesn’t seem to have reached us yet – it will, if it is a good plant.

    Best wishes Sylvia (England)

  7. Pingback: I Like This – March 30, 2010 | A Gardener's Notebook

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